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Selected Papers


 

Hutchinson M and Raff U
Sub-second MRI Data Acquisition Using Multiple Detectors.
Proceedings, Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 6th Annual Meeting August 17th 1987, New York.
Volume 1987, Issue Supplement S1, p. 459.

Hutchinson M and Raff U.
Fast MRI data acquisition using multiple detectors
Mag. Res. Med. 1988;6:87-91

Ansari AA, Mayne A, Freed CR, Breeze RE, Schneck SA, O’Brien CF, Kriek EH, Zhang YB, Mazziotta JC, Hutchinson M et al.
Lack of a detectable humoral/ cellular allogenic response in human and nonhuman primate recipients of embryonic mesencephalic allografts for the therapy of Parkinson’s disease.
Transplant Proceedings 1995;27(1):1401-5

Hutchinson M, Nenov V, and Mazziotta JC.
Neurosurgical applications of Positron Emission Tomography. Neurological Surgery, Fourth Edition,
ed by Youmans, J, pp172-184, Saunders, Philadelphia (1996)

Hutchinson M and Fazzini E.
Cholinesterase inhibition in Parkinson’s disease
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. and Psychiatry 1996;61:324-325

Hutchinson M, Rusinek H, Nenov VI, Feinberg DA and Johnson G
Segmentation analysis in functional MRI: overall sensitivity and gray matter specificity of FLASH and RARE.
J. Mag. Reson. Imaging 1997;7:361-364

Schlosser R, Hutchinson M, Joseffer S, Rusinek H, Saarimaki A, Dewey SL, Brodie JD.
Functional magnetic resonance imaging of human brain activity in a verbal fluency task.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry 1998;64:492-498

Mazziotta JC, Hutchinson M, Fife TD and Woods R.
Advanced neuroimaging methods in the study of movement disorders.
Adv. Neurol. 1998;78:153-60

Hutchinson M and Raff U.
Parkinson’s disease: a novel MRI method for determining structural changes in the substantia nigra.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatry 1999;67:815-818

Hutchinson M.
“Diagnostic Evaluation: Functional Imaging”, in Vascular Malformations of the Central Nervous System,
eds. Jafar JJ, Awad IA, Rosenwasser RH, Lipincott, Williams & Wilkins, pp 209-216 Philadelphia, 1999

Hutchinson M, Schiffer W, Joseffer S, Liu A, Schlosser R, Goldberg E, Brodie JD.
Task specific deactivations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Mag. Res. Imaging 1999;17:1427-1436

Hutchinson M and Raff U.
Structural changes of the substantia nigra in Parkinson’s disease, as revealed by MR imaging.
Am. J. Neuroradiology 2000;21:697-701

Raff U, Rojas GM, Hutchinson M and Simon JH.
Quantitation of T2 lesion load in multiple sclerosis: a novel semi-automated MR segmentation technique.
Acad Radiol. 2000;7:237-249

Hutchinson M, Nakamura T, Moeller JD, Antonini A, Belakhlef A, Dhawan V, and Eidelberg D.
The metabolic topography of essential blepharospasm: a focal dystonia with general implications.
Neurology 2000;55:673-677

Aarsland D, Hutchinson M and Larsen JP.
Cognitive, psychiatric and motor responses to galantamine in Parkinson’s Disease with dementia.
Int. J. Geriatric Psych. 2003;18:937-941

Raff U, Rojas GM, Huete I and Hutchinson M.
Computer assessment of neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s Disease using data fusion techniques with MR images.
Acad. Radiol. 2003;10:1036-1044

Hutchinson M, Raff U and Lebedev S.
MRI correlates of pathology in parkinsonism: Segmented Inversion Recovery Ratio Imaging (SIRRIM).
NeuroImage. 2003;20:1899-1902

Hutchinson M and Lebedev S.
On the use of clusters to determine environmental influence on disease.
Arch. Neurol. 2005;62:331

Hutchinson M, Spanaki C, Lebedev S, Plaitakis A.
Genetic Basis of Common Diseases: General Theory of Mendelian Recessive Genetics.
Medical Hypotheses. 2005;65:282-286

Raff U, Hutchinson M, Rojas GM, Huete I.
Inversion recovery MRI in idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease is a sensitive tool to assess neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra. Academic Radiology. 2006;13(6):721-7

Penn R, Dalvi A, Slevin J, Young B, Gash D, Gerhardt G, Hutchinson M.
GDNF in the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease: response to editorial.
Lancet Neurology. 2006;5:202-203

Hutchinson M, Gurney S, Newson R
GDNF in Parkinson Disease: an object lesson in the tyranny of Type II.
J. Neuroscience Methods. 2007;163:190-192

Hutchinson M and Swanson PD
Chaos theory and the treatment of refractory status epilepticus: who benefits from prolonged anesthesia, and is there a better way?
Medical Hypotheses 2007;68:439-441

Rojas GM, Raff U, Quintana JC, Huete I, Hutchinson M
Image fusion in neuroradiology: three clinical examples including MRI of Parkinson’s Disease.
Computerized Medical Imaging and Graphics. 2007;31:17-21

Hutchinson M and Raff U
On false negatives in MRI studies of Parkinson’s Disease.
Movement Disorders 2007;22(10):383-385

Hutchinson M and Raff U
Detection of Parkinson’s Disease by MRI: Spin-Lattice Distribution Imaging.
Movement Disorders 2008;23(14):1991-1997

Hutchinson M
Neuroimaging of movement disorders.
Neurology Continuum 2008;14(4):164-174

Hutchinson M
On the toxicity of GDNF.
Toxicologic Pathology 2008;36:522

Hutchinson M
At last, a gene therapy for Parkinson’s Disease?
Lancet Neurol. 2011;10(4):290-291

Hutchinson M
Gene therapy for Parkinson Disease: where do we stand?
Journal Watch Neurology. 2011;13(7):51-52

Hutchinson M and Raff U
Spin-Lattice Distribution MRI maps nigral pathology in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) during life: a pilot study.
PLOS ONE 2013, in press

Michael Hutchinson, MD, PhD

Dr. Hutchinson is a board-certified neurologist and senior faculty at the Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, Manhattan. His clinical interests include headaches, dementia, concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI), Parkinson's Disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, anxiety and REM sleep disorders.  He has an extensive scientific background and brings a science-based approach to solving clinical problems.

During residency at the University of Washington, Hutchinson used his knowledge of chaos theory to propose a new way of treating status epilepticus, the most lethal form of epilepsy. The treatment proved successful and is now standard-of-care in the US. Hutchinson later did a sabbatical at Queen Square, London, where Ian McDonald was pioneering the use of beta interferon as the first treatment for multiple sclerosis.

 

After residency training, Hutchinson underwent a neuroimaging fellowship in Los Angeles.

 

After arriving at NYU in 1994, Hutchinson pioneered the use of cholinesterase inhibitors as a treatment for the dementia of Parkinson's disease. At the time this was considered forbidden because it might make the patient physically worse, but Hutchinson argued that this premise was ill-conceived. Today, cholineserase inhibitors are standard-of-care in Parkinson dementia. Hutchinson later developed a new way of treating acute relapses in multiple sclerosis, which puts the patient in charge, and which has yielded impressive long-term results.

 

During his time at NYU, Hutchinson made early contributions to functional MRI, discovering that regional brain activations during cognitive tasks are accompanied by widespread deactivations.  In structural imaging, Hutchinson combined physics, neuropathology, and image processing to develop a robust MRI biomarker for Parkinson's disease.

 

In addition to certification in neurology, Hutchinson is certified in neuroimaging (MRI and CT of the brain and spine), which combines neuroanatomy, neuropathology and neurophysiology, fields which form the unique base of clinical neurology.

 

Dr. Hutchinson holds a PhD in molecular physics and is inventor of spatial sensitivity encoding for MRI - sometimes referred to as parallel MRI - which is now the acknowledged standard for clinical MRI. He is currently exploring a possible extension of this to ultrafast imaging.

Read more

Michael Hutchinson, MD, PhD

Dr. Hutchinson is a board-certified neurologist and senior faculty at the Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai, Manhattan. His clinical interests include headaches, dementia, concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI), Parkinson's Disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, anxiety and REM sleep disorders.  He has an extensive scientific background and brings a science-based approach to solving clinical problems.

During residency at the University of Washington, Hutchinson used his knowledge of chaos theory to propose a new way of treating status epilepticus, the most lethal form of epilepsy. The treatment proved successful and is now standard-of-care in the US. Hutchinson later did a sabbatical at Queen Square, London, where Ian McDonald was pioneering the use of beta interferon as the first treatment for multiple sclerosis.

 

After residency training, Hutchinson underwent a neuroimaging fellowship in Los Angeles.

 

After arriving at NYU in 1994, Hutchinson pioneered the use of cholinesterase inhibitors as a treatment for the dementia of Parkinson's disease. At the time this was considered forbidden because it might make the patient physically worse, but Hutchinson argued that this premise was ill-conceived. Today, cholineserase inhibitors are standard-of-care in Parkinson dementia. Hutchinson later developed a new way of treating acute relapses in multiple sclerosis, which puts the patient in charge, and which has yielded impressive long-term results.

 

During his time at NYU, Hutchinson made early contributions to functional MRI, discovering that regional brain activations during cognitive tasks are accompanied by widespread deactivations.  In structural imaging, Hutchinson combined physics, neuropathology, and image processing to develop a robust MRI biomarker for Parkinson's disease.

 

In addition to certification in neurology, Hutchinson is certified in neuroimaging (MRI and CT of the brain and spine), which combines neuroanatomy, neuropathology and neurophysiology, fields which form the unique base of clinical neurology.

 

Dr. Hutchinson holds a PhD in molecular physics and is inventor of spatial sensitivity encoding for MRI - sometimes referred to as parallel MRI - which is now the acknowledged standard for clinical MRI. He is currently exploring a possible extension of this to ultrafast imaging.


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Michael Hutchinson, MD
35 35th St.
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New York, NY 10016